National Agri-Marketing Association
NAMA Website
Upcoming Events
Chapters
Agri-Marketing Conf
Best of NAMA 2018
Member Directory












FARM FUTURES SURVEY REPORTS WHY FARMERS FEEL THREATENED BY NEW ADMINISTRATION
Source: blog by Mike Wilson, Farm Futures magazine

For the last four years Donald Trump was a dream president for U.S. agriculture. Despite a crippling trade war with China, a close call converting NAFTA to USMCA, and some slip-ups with small oil refineries weaseling out of RFS, Trump made an instant connection with farm voters. His deregulation crusade, topped by the WOTUS re-vamp and tax relief, was music to agriculture's ears.

Despite being a big city millionaire Trump's plain talk resonated with rural voters, and that love was reciprocated at the ballot box.



So maybe it's no surprise to learn what our post-election survey reveals about farmers, President Joe Biden, and the new Democrat-led Congress. Despite Biden's calls for unity and declarations he will be a president for all Americans including Trump voters, farmers are clearly uneasy about the next four years.

Should they be?

Our survey shows nearly nine of every 10 farmers believe taxes will go up under a Biden administration. Another 71% believe WOTUS will be overturned. Only 22% believe markets will stabilize with a new trade strategy. And four of every five farmers believe there will be less government ad hoc funds going to agriculture.

For the last four years Donald Trump was a dream president for U.S. agriculture. Despite a crippling trade war with China, a close call converting NAFTA to USMCA, and some slip-ups with small oil refineries weaseling out of RFS, Trump made an instant connection with farm voters. His deregulation crusade, topped by the WOTUS re-vamp and tax relief, was music to agriculture's ears.

Despite being a big city millionaire Trump's plain talk resonated with rural voters, and that love was reciprocated at the ballot box.

So maybe it's no surprise to learn what our post-election survey reveals about farmers, President Joe Biden, and the new Democrat-led Congress. Despite Biden's calls for unity and declarations he will be a president for all Americans including Trump voters, farmers are clearly uneasy about the next four years.

Should they be?

Our survey shows nearly nine of every 10 farmers believe taxes will go up under a Biden administration. Another 71% believe WOTUS will be overturned. Only 22% believe markets will stabilize with a new trade strategy. And four of every five farmers believe there will be less government ad hoc funds going to agriculture.

"I am worried about everything in that survey," says Vinton, Iowa, corn and soybean farmer Lance Lillibridge. "The Biden administration may look at WOTUS, and I believe taxes may go up as well. Stepped-up-basis (adjusted value of inherited assets) needs to stay where it's at because otherwise it's double taxation. It's working well now."

The unease in farm country today feels similar to farmer attitudes after President Barack Obama was elected. And while farm organizations and lobbyists engage with new political leaders on Capitol Hill, it may be some comfort to remember that, "when it comes to ag policy, usually the worst doesn't happen, but you need to be prepared for changes," says Farm Futures Ag Policy Editor Jacqui Fatka. "You hope you don't get to the far extremes."

To read the entire report click here.


Search News & Articles













Proudly associated with:
American Business Media Canadian Agri-Marketing Association National Agri-Marketing Association
Agricultural Relations Council National Association of Farm Broadcasters American Agricultural Editors' Association Livestock Publications Council
All content © 2021, Henderson Communications LLC. | User Agreement